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icon free smAren’t sure what type of fabric to use for period costume? Diana steers you toward more convincing, historically accurate fabrics.

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You may remember reading in January's blog that Katherine Caron-Greig was in Paris for the New Year, happily photographing some of the best paintings in the Louvre. Such was our jealousy that it seems only right to feature the Louvre as our Website of the Month for February!

I was once told how a woman vowed to visit every single work of art in the famous Paris museum; it took her five full days to see it all. The Musée du Louvre houses 35,000 works of art drawn from eight departments, displayed in over 60,000 square meters of exhibition space dedicated to the permanent collections. The website encourages the visitor to "explore the works on display, taking a thematic or cross-departmental approach," but on such a vast site, this can be daunting! To get you started, we've picked out a few highlights for you...

icon free smMore historically accurate than Disney, yet quick, easy and inexpensive, with separate pieces that can begin a mix-and-match costume collection.

Bjarne Drews

Danish embroiderer and costume maker Bjarne Drews has a magnificent obsession with the costume and embellishment of the eighteenth century European royal courts. Your Wardrobe Unlock'd caught up with him in Copenhagen to talk about what it is that fascinates him, how he got started and how you can get started too in the intricate art of hand embroidery.

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Hi. My name is Vicky Clarke, and I'm a writer, housewife, bellydancer, and general creative rebel. I live in Cambridge, UK, along with my partner and a quite ridiculous collection of craft materials.

My interest in home-made clothes began in my childhood; growing up in the late 70s it was the handmade clothes I wore (along with mustard-brown Denby crockery and nasty, nasty wallpaper) that formed the backdrop of my daily life.

Tags: Interviews

Elizabethan tailor

This month, you may watch in amusement as I wrangle with a subject I know very little about.

If you're as briefly acquainted with Tudor and Elizabethan costume as I am, prepare for a treat as we "ooh" and "aah" together over a new and wonderful branch of costume. Meanwhile, if this is your thang, you may alternatively watch in the aforementioned amusement and then go off to our Website of the Month in informed adoration of your very favourite thing.

ImageThis month, Sarah Lorraine answers your questions about historical accuracy, matching patterns and the delicate art of wig-making...

 

 

 

 

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My grandmother had her own atelier where she made fur coats after World War II until they went out of fashion. My mother is a costumer and has studied arts. I studied Graphic Design & Mediation and always loved crafts.


I did not start sewing until after my divorce, when I had to sell my horses I suddenly had time and a desire to do something new and for myself. I used to help my mother with basting and cutting of clothes to make, but never actually used a sewing machine.

I only started in 2004, I made most improvement by one simple rule, sew everyday for at least one hour. First it's to make progress, next it's to maintain your level.

ImageEnglishwoman Michelle Pye has an extraordinary breadth of experience within sewing. She is an accomplished tailoress, dressmaker, teacher and retailer of fine interlinings.

 

 

 

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